Posts Tagged ‘Autos’

Most Popular Car Color in Japan

Wednesday, August 27th, 2008

We’ve told you about the most popular car color in the United States, but what about Japan? Are the Japanese buying white in droves as much as Americans are? According to DuPont’s 55th Global Automotive Color Popularity Report, they certainly are. As you can see from the cart below, 24% of all vehicles purchased in Japan in 2007 were white. While white wasn’t as popular as silver in intermediate or compact/sports cars, or black in SUVs, it dominated in luxury cars and MPVs. In fact, white was even more popular in Japan than it was in the US!

Most Popular Car Color in Japan

Most Popular Truck Color

Wednesday, August 27th, 2008

We’ve told you about the most popular car color, but what about the most popular truck color? Are truck owners buying white in droves as much as car owners are? According to DuPont’s 55th Global Automotive Color Popularity Report, they certainly are. As you can see from the chart below, 24% of truck owners purchased white in 2008—more than vehicle owners in any other category!

Most Popular Truck Color in North America

Most Popular Car Colors in China

Monday, August 25th, 2008

We’ve told you about the most popular car color in the United States, but what about China? Are Chinese buying white in droves as much as Americans are? According to DuPont’s 55th Global Automotive Color Popularity Report, the answer is no. As you can see from the cart below, only 15% of all vehicles purchased in China in 2007 were white. Silver is the most popular color in China at 23%, followed by black at 22%.

Most Popular Car Colors in China

Most Popular Car Color in America

Thursday, August 21st, 2008


Cars have been available in a range of colors since the first Model T rolled onto the market. It was only later, from 1914 to 1926, that the Model T was available in just one color—black. Henry Ford is often quoted as proclaiming that “Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black.” Supposedly, black paint dried faster than any other paint of the time and thus led to cars roll.

Most Popular Car Color
Before it was cool.

Of course, the full range of colors is available today. In fact, a couple of urban legends have been spawned by the idea that a car’s color is indicative of the owner’s personality. While there is no evidence that insurance companies use automobiles’ colors to determine insurance quotes, it’s still a common assumption along with the idea that red cars are more likely to get ticketed by police officers.

You may be wondering, what is the most popular car color? For seven years, silver was the most popular car color. It was seen as both a high-tech color and one that was safe for resell—not as many people would be turned off by a silver car as would be turned off by, say, a green car.

Buyers in 2007, however, broke the mold by buying more white cars than cars in any other color. Why? Well, it’s been said that a high-tech color like silver isn’t popular anymore. I disagree. I don’t think silver is a high-tech color anymore. Looking at the popularity of iPods, iPhones and other Apple products, I’d say white is going to be the color of technology for some time.

In 2007, nineteen percent of cars manufactured were white. Twenty-two percent of luxury cars were white. Eighteen percent of all cars were silver and sixteen percent were black.

Of course, given years of popularity, silver cars will still outnumber autos of other colors for awhile.

2007 Most Popular Car Colors
Source: DuPont 2007 Global Automotive Color Popularity Report

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Most Popular Car in America

Tuesday, February 13th, 2007

To be the most popular car in America, a model has to posses a wealth of features- reliability, safety, inoffensive yet attractive styling, power, and good gas mileage. Considering these design features, what is the most popular car? These desirable traits come together in the Toyota Camry, making it the highest selling and most popular car in America since 2002.

Launched in limited numbers in America in 1982, the first Camry was compact cars available in hatchback and sedan body styles. A second generation model followed in 1987, upgrading available engine power and offering new safety features such as anti-lock breaks and all-wheel drive. The hatchback model would vanish, replaced by the wagon body style. First sold in America in 1992, the third generation of the Toyota Camry ditched its compact roots to become a mid-size family sedan. 1997 saw the debut of the restyled fourth generation Camry, followed by the introduction of the Camry Solara coupe in 1999. Available as both a hardtop and a convertible, the Solara was built with more graceful and youth-oriented styling than the Camry. In 2000, the Camry became the highest selling car in America for the first time in its history, with reported figures of 422,930 sold. The next timely iteration to the Camry occurred in 2001, when America’s most popular car became much taller and roomier. The wagon body style was dumped for the fifth generation Camry. The sixth generation, launching in 2006, marked a decided change in the Camry’s styling. The aggressive front fascia compliments the available 3.5L V6, giving the new Camry much more power than any of the previous versions. America’s most popular car is now also available as a hybrid, using Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive technology.

most popular car, Toyota Camry
Toyota Camry Hybrid

The Toyota Camry classically performs well in crash safety tests, with all models since 1997 receiving a “Good” frontal crash rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Strangely, the fifth generation Camry receives a “Poor” rating in side impact tests from the IIHS when not equipped with side-impact airbags. The side airbag option, introduced in 2004, improves the side impact rating to “Good”.

Sales of the Camry in America peaked in 2006, with the nation’s most popular family sedan selling 448,445 units. The Camry’s future includes a foray into the increasingly popular NASCAR Nextel Cup, making it the first non-domestic car to compete in NASCAR in recent years. 2007 also expects to see the Camry produced in America for the first time, finally bringing America’s most popular car a little closer to home.

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